Jumping lines by returning back to the root

The line to Abel ends when he dies, but resumes when Adam and Eve have a replacement son, Seth.

The line to Abram seems headed to Ishmael, but it goes to Isaac instead.

Jacob’s firstborn is Reuben, but he loses the birthright to Joseph (double portion to Ephraim) and the blessing to Judah (Messianic line).

Judah’s 2 sons died leaving Tamar a childless widow and his surviving youngest son the apparent heir. But then the firstborn line resumed when Judah unwittingly gave Tamar seed and she bore him twins.

Elimelech, of the tribe of Judah, dies with his 2 sons in Moab, ending their line; but Boaz redeems it by taking Ruth to be his wife and the inheretance goes to their son Obed, father of Jesse, father of King David.

David lost his 1st son Amnon and 3rd son Absalom so his 3rd son Adonijah  seemed destined to reign (David’s 2nd son Chileab/Daniel was born to the widow Abigail so belonged to her husband’s line). But it was Bathsheba’s 2nd son Solomon who got the kingdom.

Eli, a descendant of Moses’ brother Aaron, was the high priest in the days of Samuel, but his line became cursed because of his sons’ sins. Years later when Solomon became king, Eli’s family line was finally removed – and Zadok was made the high priest instead, who traced his line back to Aaron by different route.

Solomon’s sons were the kings of Judah until Jeconiah was finally cursed and that line was cast off by God like a discarded signet ring. Nevertheless, the prophet Haggai said somebody named Zurubabel (“Zoro”) – the name of Coniah’s grandson and a governor of the Jews – would be restored as the signet. However, there were actually 2 Zurbabels – the true “Zoro” was in a separate line that descending from Solomon’s younger brother Nathan to Heli, the father of the Virgin Mary.

The recurring theme is that of a family line that comes to an end, but then through curious happen-stance a dormant second line re-emerges to take the precedence.

Going back to Noah, we see that the entire old testament is almost exclusively concerned with Ham and Shem. Ham produces the carnal civilizations of Babylon, Egypt, Phoenicia, and Canaan – but knowledge of the true God is with the Shemetic people, and particularly the Jews. Noah’s son Japheth is largely ignored from the narrative – until you get to the New Testament. Ham, Shem, Japheth is the same order as Noah’s prophecy:

” And Noah awoke from his wine, and knew what his younger son had done unto him. And he said, Cursed be Canaan; a servant of servants shall he be unto his brethren. And he said, Blessed be the LORD God of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant. God shall enlarge Japheth, and he shall dwell in the tents of Shem; and Canaan shall be his servant.” Genesis 9:24-27

Noah’s designated line of blessing that the Oriental Shem had possessed from 2000 B.C. abruptly ended in the first century A.D. when the Jews rejected Christ – and then it reverted to that ancient line of Japheth, the progenitor of the white race. Japheth was enlarged and moved into Shem’s tent. Japheth is, generally speaking, Christendom.

We were not unfruitful in our knowledge of God, as the Jews were, but endeavoured to also teach the world Christianity.

As the church and bride (if we are saved), we have all spiritual blessing because of our unity with Christ. We haven’t lacked anything, but there remains a great untapped potential that will be realized when finally the remnant Jews at the end of the tribulation turn to Christ:

” For if the casting away of them be the reconciling of the world, what shall the receiving of them be, but life from the dead?” Romans 11:15

The excitement of hurrying this eventuality became a great temptation for St Paul who yearned so much to see the salvation of the Jews that he cut short the mission Christ had instructed him to carry out amongst the Gentiles in order to go to Jerusalem on a certain Pentacost hoping for a revival that never happened. But God used the occasion nevertheless to pull Paul westward again to testify before Caesar, albeit in chains.

” And if some of the branches be broken off, and thou, being a wild olive tree, wert graffed in among them, and with them partakest of the root and fatness of the olive tree; Boast not against the branches. But if thou boast, thou bearest not the root, but the root thee. Thou wilt say then, The branches were broken off, that I might be graffed in. Well; because of unbelief they were broken off, and thou standest by faith. Be not highminded, but fear: For if God spared not the natural branches, take heed lest he also spare not thee. Behold therefore the goodness and severity of God: on them which fell, severity; but toward thee, goodness, if thou continue in his goodness: otherwise thou also shalt be cut off. And they also, if they abide not still in unbelief, shall be graffed in: for God is able to graff them in again. For if thou wert cut out of the olive tree which is wild by nature, and wert graffed contrary to nature into a good olive tree: how much more shall these, which be the natural branches, be graffed into their own olive tree? For I would not, brethren, that ye should be ignorant of this mystery, lest ye should be wise in your own conceits; that blindness in part is happened to Israel, until the fulness of the Gentiles be come in. And so all Israel shall be saved: as it is written, There shall come out of Sion the Deliverer, and shall turn away ungodliness from Jacob: For this is my covenant unto them, when I shall take away their sins. As concerning the gospel, they are enemies for your sakes: but as touching the election, they are beloved for the fathers’ sakes.” Romans 11:17-28

Nobody – Jew or Gentile – can presume salvation on account of nationality. We must all individually get saved by repenting and trusting Christ’s finished work on the cross, who died for our sins and rose again to save us.

” And it shall come to pass, that every soul, which will not hear that prophet, shall be destroyed from among the people.” Acts 3:23

 



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